ABSTRACT SUBMISSION and FORMAT

International Wheat Quality Conference (IWQC-II)
Manhattan, Kansas, USA
May 20-24, 2001

The following plans and guidelines are provided  for speaker, facilitator and poster paper abstract preparations:

All speaker and poster paper abstracts will be included in the final printing of the Conference Program.  All speaker papers and all abstracts will be published in the Conference Proceedings.

Conference Speakers and Facilitators are expected to submit an abstract to their respective Session Co-Chair.  If not previously submitted, preliminary speaker and facilitator abstracts should be submitted (due January 1, 2000)  for Session program development.  Facilitators should develop and submit an abstract describing the topics, questions and approach to discussion facilitation for Session Co-Chair coordination.  Final, publishable abstracts must be submitted by January 31, 2001 to meet the Conference Program printing schedule.  Speaker and facilitor abstract delivery should be coordinated with your respective Session Co-Chair who will in turn provide an electronic copy to the Conference Co-Chairs, Okkyung K. Chung and James L. Steele.  Please consult directly with your respective Session Co-Chairs.  Email addresses for all Session Co-Chairs may be found on this link:  Technical Session Co-Chairs, USA and International.

Poster Paper Authors are expected to submit a proposal abstract to John D. Hubbard or Jeff D. Wilson.  Poster Paper proposal abstracts should be submitted as soon as possible for Conference acceptance and confirmation.  A final, publishable copy must be submitted to John D. Hubbard or Jeff D. Wilson by February 22, 2001 to meet the Conference Program printing schedule.  Publishable abstracts will be sequenced and assigned a number in harmony with country of origin, content and poster display board sequence.  An electronic copy of these ordered and numbered abstracts will be provided to the Conference Co-Chairs, Okkyung K. Chung and James L. Steele.  Poster Paper abstracts may be provided by hard copy, FAX or as an E-Mail attachment, Word Perfect or Word format, text only.  Electronic transmission via E-Mail attachment is expedient in providing an electronic copy and a means of rapid communication, thus the preferred method.  The transmission addresses are:

John D. Hubbard or Jeff D. Wilson
Grain Marketing and Production Research Center
1515 College Avenue
Manhattan, Kansas 66502, USA
or FAX: 785-537-5534
or E-Mail: John D. Hubbard <john@usgmrl.ksu.edu> or Jeff D. Wilson <jdw@usgmrl.ksu.edu>
Ph: 785-776-2757

The following abstract format is required for printing and publication:

Total block size: Maximum of 37 lines at 72 char/line, a total of 2664 text characters

Header: Maximum of  7 lines; at 72 char/line; a block space of 504 text characters;
               all lines centered;
               first line identifies the abstract as a 'speaker' or 'poster' abstract, in bold caps;
               second line, title, capitalize first letter of words, in bold;
               third line, authors, not bold;
               fourth line, company or institution, not bold;
               fifth line, street address, not bold;
               sixth line, address - city, state/province, postal codes, country, not bold;
               seventh line, blank

Abstract Text: Maximum of 30 lines at 72 char/line, a block space of 2160 text characters

Example Header and Abstract Requirements:

L#                                      Definition
01  (center, bold)       SPEAKER ABSTRACT or POSTER ABSTRACT        56789012
02  (center, bold, title) Use of Response Surface ... Absorption    56789012
03  (center, authors)       Mark Ingelin and Odean Lukow            56789012
04  (center, company/institution)                          67890123456789012
05  (center, street address)                               67890123456789012
06  (center, City, State/Province, Postal Codes, Country)  67890123456789012
07  (blank line)
08  (begin abstract text) 34567890123456789012345678901234567890123456789012
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Please note that non-break spaces should be used to prevent line breaks between words that should not be broken at the end of a line.  A person's first, mid-initial and last name is a common example of where non-break spaces may be used to avoid a line break or line splitting of names when reformatting of text.  Please consider this and other problems that might be encountered in advance of reformatting needs.

Example Abstract:

01                               POSTER ABSTRACT
02    Use of Response Surface Methods to Determine Mixograph Absorption
03                        Mark Ingelin and Odean Lukow
04        Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Cereal Research Centre
05                               195 Dafoe Road
06                   Winnipeg, Manitoba, R3T 2M9, Canada
07
08  Dedicated data acquisition and analysis software such as MixSmart© has
09  made more objective mixograph measures possible.  Following statistical
10  analysis, ?envelope peak time' and ?width at peak' were selected as
11  parameters best able to resolve differences based on absorption between
12  mixograms.  The product of these two terms is used to select a flour's
13  optimum absorption from a three mixogram series run at 2% increments.
14  Response surface methodology (RSM) can further define absorption in a
15  mixogram series.  One treatment variable is absorption.  The three
16  levels used correspond to the three different absorptions used in a
17  mixogram series.  The second treatment variable is mixing time.  Five
18  levels of this variable are clustered around the peak time of the
19  central mixogram of the series.  The response variable is the amount of
20  work input into the dough/minute.  The more robust the regression
21  maximum, the more clearly defined the mixing peak.  The output from RSM
22  analysis includes optimum absorption, probability and R2 values.  When
23  measured over a 10% absorption range, replicate absorption
24  determinations agree within 1%.  Mixograph vs. bake absorption relations
25  have Rsq of 0.82.  This analysis is applicable whenever power
26  reading/time are collected, including the GRL mixer and the
27  Mixatron(tm).
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Please submit your abstract by email to John Hubbard or Jeff Wilson.  Regards from IWQC-II.
Last Updated: January 26, 2001 1:30am jsteele